[F1 2019 VIDEO FEATURE] MERCEDES-AMG: BUILDING W10

Mercedes launches its new W10, its challenger for the 2019 season, at a private test this week; and there’s nothing to suggest it won’t again be the car that all other teams will be chasing.

But, that doesn’t mean the Silver Arrows aren’t going flat-out to again up their game against main rivals Ferrari and Red Bull.

… with the team hinting on Twitter that it may run a disruptive camouflage livery for testing, running a teaser image of the front wing with the caption:  “Silver is so last season…”

And, while it may end up being Silver once the team lands in Melbourne, the W10’s journey to Albert Park began more than a year ago.

SOUNDBITE (English) JAMES ALLISON,
TECHNICAL DIRECTOR, MERCEDES:
“A new car actually starts a lot earlier than people think it does. And the W10, our 2019 car, started actually in the dying months of 2017. The earliest parts of that new project are the chief designers of that power unit, over in HPP [in Brixworth] and the chief designer of the chassis in Brackley, getting together to set out what their aims and goals are for the new car.”

Once the parameters are set, the design work begins with 150,000 man hours and 19,000 CAD drawings needed, to be able to create the 14,500 components that make up an F1 car.

From there, the parts are manufactured or purchased, built and tested for use in anger on track, initially during pre-season testing.

And while throughout this time, the drivers are away – they’re not relaxing, far from it, with this time requiring maximum effort.

SOUNDBITE (English) JAMES ALLISON,
TECHNICAL DIRECTOR, MERCEDES:
“The interesting thing is that the drivers throughout this period are both physically absent and but ever-present in this new car because this is the time of year when we’re building and preparing the [F1] car [and] where the drivers are building and preparing themselves for the challenge that’s to come in the next year. So although they are not physically present, the car, the car, itself is something which they have played a big part in.”

All of which will ensure the drivers are in top form for pre-season testing next week, when the loop finally closes on 18 months of hard work, and the next cycle of development can begin.

SOUNDBITE (English) JAMES ALLISON,
TECHNICAL DIRECTOR, MERCEDES:
“We hope, when we start turning our wheels in Barcelona, they will pick up the car and they will see the way in which we’ve responded to the weaknesses and the strengths that were fed back to us over the previous year.”